Project Showcase

Rustic Yellow Birch

Rustic Yellow Birch


Rustic yellow birch comes from the sapwood of the birch tree, It is a creamy white color with some yellow undertones, and can have slight color variation from board to board. Its grain is typically fine with uniform curls, although some boards may appear to be almost clear, with little to no graining. These photos are from home in Falmouth, Massachusetts, where our flooring was used.
Hard Maple

Hard Maple


This hard maple floor was the choice of homeowners who built the first LEED-certified home in Newport, R.I. The creamy white color of hard maple creates a clean look. Its close grain pattern is more subtle than that of many other woods. It is often chosen for its durability and warm look.
Birch

Birch


The white birch that is native to the northeast and north central states is chosen by those who are attracted to the brown flecking (also known as worm tracks!) that is present throughout the floor. Yellow birch owes its interesting color contrast to the presence of the lighter colored sapwood and contrasting earth-colored heartwood. Rustic yellow birch will give you a floor that has lots of character and contrasting color.
White Oak

White Oak


The white oak tree is the most majestic of all the oaks. It can often grow to be wider than it is tall! And it is a favorite of nuthatches and woodpeckers. The rich brown hues and the dramatic grains of white oak lumber are brought out with just a natural finish. A white oak floor is versatile and brings a sense of comfort and peace to your setting.
Heart Pine

Heart Pine


Heart pine is a favorite for those looking for a floor that ages with grace! Heart pine is unique from other pine floors due to its tight growth rings which create interesting patterns. The high content of heart wood brings an amber color to the floor, adding to its natural beauty.
White Pine

White Pine


Here is your wide pine floor! Eastern white pine is a relatively soft wood, and when you choose it for your floor, be prepared to see scratches and dings. But, this also adds character. And, it is available in wider widths than other species.
Cherry

Cherry


Cherry flooring is stunning. When it is first installed, the color starts out pale red in color. As it ages, the color of the floor becomes deep brown with rich reddish tones. The character of the floor lends itself to both a rustic and a formal look.
Northern Red Oak

Northern Red Oak


There is a difference when it comes to red oak! We in the northeast are proud of what is called Northern Red Oak. Due to the short growing season here in New England, Northern Red Oak is known for its rich red color and dense grain. Growth rings are closer together, which creates a richer color and distinctive grain pattern. It is a very durable floor, and is used in high traffic areas. It is warm and versatile.
Hickory

Hickory


This floor was recently installed in Brewster, Mass. Installed in what is affectionately referred to as the “man cave”, this hickory floor is stunning. The flooring installer was ecstatic-said it was the easiest floor he had ever installed. Local hickory has dramatic grain patterns that range from chocolate brown to a golden color. The heart wood of the tree is where the chocolate comes from and the sapwood is cream colored. Hickory is the hardest hardwood in North America and is extremely durable.
Rustic Hickory

Rustic Hickory


This floor was installed in Dublin, N.H. Rustic hickory flooring has more character knots and variations in the wood, occasionally referred to as calico coloring. The durability of hickory makes it a perfect choice for a high traffic area, like this “game room.” When we refer to “local,” we are referring to hickory that has been harvested in the southeastern part of New Hampshire, Massachusetts or Connecticut.