Wood Products

Ash

Ash


Ash flooring offers a consistency of color, clarity and character. The color of ash floors can range from a light color (sapwood) to a beautiful rich brown (heartwood). Most ash flooring has a balance of sap and heartwood, which results in an ash floor that has subtle swirling grain patterns combined with occasional knots. Ash is a very durable wood, and can be used in high traffic areas.
Birch

Birch


Birch flooring is milled from yellow or black birch. Birch flooring combines gentle, waving grain patterns and cathedral patterns that range from white (sapwood) to rich reddish brown (heartwood). Birch is a light wood that is close grained and has a uniform texture. When you purchase a birch floor, you can purchase it in a number of ways. If you are looking for a “light” color, you want birch that is primarily sapwood. Heartwood will give you a floor that is redder in color. You can also do a combination of both heartwood and sapwood in a custom floor.
Eastern White Pine

Eastern White Pine


Eastern white pine is softer and less dense than Southern Yellow Pine. Eastern white pine flooring is what we recognize as the plank flooring that has been used since the colonial days. The fact that it dents easily appeals to people who are looking for that old world character. Eastern white pine flooring is warm and appealing, and is available from 6”-18”. This pine is also used for finish work, siding, post and beam construction, and log homes. Janka rating 380
Heart Pine

Heart Pine


Heart pine is the heartwood of Southern Yellow Pine and has a hardness rivaling oak. Heartwood pine flooring has a rich, warm color. Heartwood pine is available in widths ranging from 6”-12”. Janka rating 1225
Hickory

Hickory


Hickory flooring has dramatic grain patterns ranging from bright gold to a chocolate brown. The wood is dense and has wide variations between the sapwood and the heartwood. The heartwood is “chocolate” in appearance and the sapwood is cream colored. Slow growth hickory flooring creates a very attractive floor. Hickory is the hardest hardwood of the North American hardwoods. It is an extremely durable wood and has growth rings that are less pronounced than they are in oak or ash; Hickory was traditionally used for yokes for oxen, ax handles and most farm and construction tools. Janka rating 1820
Maple

Maple


Maple floors range in color from a bright white color to a deep brown gray tone (heartwood). For a contemporary look, maple hardwood flooring can be kept bone white. Maple is one of the most durable North American hardwoods; and is sought after by fine cabinet makers and millwork shops. Janka rating 1450
Northern Cherry

Northern Cherry


Cherry floors will darken as it ages. When you first install cherry, it starts out pale red in color. The exposure to air and sunlight cause it to darken and become a rich dark red color. It has a beautiful and distinctive grain and is known as “semi-ring diffused”. This means that it shows some growth rings, but the rings are not as pronounced as you will find in oak or ash. Cherry is a widely sought after wood, admired for its deep, distinctive richness of color. It is used for flooring, furniture, and cabinetry. Janka rating 995.
Norway Pine

Norway Pine


Norway pine is cousin to the southern pines. Norway pine flooring is a harder wood than the white pine that is native to the northeast. The knots in Norway pine are darker red and more pronounced. Finished widths for Norway pine range from 5”-11”.
 Oak

Oak


There is a difference when it comes to red oak! The northeast is proud of its Northern Red Oak. Actually, New Hampshire probably has the highest percentage of true red oak than any other area in the United States. Due to the short growing season in New England, Northern Red Oak distinguishes itself with its rich red color and dense grain. Growth rings are closer together creating a distinctive grain pattern. Northern Red Oak flooring is known for its denseness, consistency of color and grain, texture, and its beauty. Highly sought after, Northern Red Oak is used for flooring, stair treads, stair parts, furniture, and millwork.
Southern Yellow Pine

Southern Yellow Pine


Southern yellow pine is used primarily for dimensional lumber and plywood. About 85% of all pressure treated wood produced in the USA is Southern Yellow Pine. Interestingly, it was a very popular choice for flooring during the 19th century for homes and industrial buildings. Janka rating 690 +870.
Walnut

Walnut


The heartwood of the black or American walnut ranges in color from a rich, almost chocolate-brown to purplish-black, sometimes having a purplish cast with dark streaks. Although the grain is mostly straight and open, the wood is prized for the wavy and curly figures that sometimes appear in it.